Synthetic Letter Of Credit

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DEFINITION of 'Synthetic Letter Of Credit'

A letter of credit that has been pre-funded by the bank on the closing date, instead of when the funds are drawn as needed. The funds accessible through a synthetic letter of credit are typically held in a credit-linked deposit account until required.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Synthetic Letter Of Credit'

Since the funds borrowed through a synthetic letter of credit are given immediately, they are a more liquid source of funds to the borrower than a standard letter of credit. The proceeds are therefore considered more secure, as there is no counterparty risk which could result in the funds becoming unavailable.

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