Synthetic Letter Of Credit

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DEFINITION of 'Synthetic Letter Of Credit'

A letter of credit that has been pre-funded by the bank on the closing date, instead of when the funds are drawn as needed. The funds accessible through a synthetic letter of credit are typically held in a credit-linked deposit account until required.

BREAKING DOWN 'Synthetic Letter Of Credit'

Since the funds borrowed through a synthetic letter of credit are given immediately, they are a more liquid source of funds to the borrower than a standard letter of credit. The proceeds are therefore considered more secure, as there is no counterparty risk which could result in the funds becoming unavailable.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. How does investment banking differ from commercial banking?

    Investment banking and commercial banking are two primary segments of the banking industry. Investment banks facilitate the ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Why do commercial banks borrow from the Federal Reserve?

    Commercial banks borrow from the Federal Reserve primarily to meet reserve requirements when their cash on hand is low before ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How does a bank determine what my discretionary income is when making a loan decision?

    Discretionary income is the money left over from your gross income each month after taking out taxes and paying for necessities. ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What role does a correspondent bank play in an international transaction?

    A correspondent bank is most typically used in international buy, sell or money transfer transactions to facilitate foreign ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What is the difference between a correspondent bank and intermediary bank?

    Correspondent and intermediary banks serve as third-party banks that coordinate with beneficiary banks to facilitate international ... Read Full Answer >>
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