Synthetic Lease

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DEFINITION of 'Synthetic Lease'

An operating lease that is structured in a way so that it is not recorded as a liability on the balance sheet. Instead, it is considered to be an expense on the income statement.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Synthetic Lease'

Basically, a synthetic lease allows a company to control real estate without being required to show the real estate as an asset on the financial statements

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