T-Test

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What is a 'T-Test'

A T-test is a statistical examination of two population means. A two-sample t-test examines whether two samples are different and is commonly used when the variances of two normal distributions are unknown and when an experiment uses a small sample size. For example, a t-test could be used to compare the average floor routine score of the U.S. women's Olympic gymnastic team to the average floor routine score of China's women's team.

BREAKING DOWN 'T-Test'

The test statistic in the t-test is known as the t-statistic. The t-test looks at the t-statistic, t-distribution and degrees of freedom to determine a p value (probability) that can be used to determine whether the population means differ. The t-test is one of a number of hypothesis tests. To compare three or more variables, statisticians use an analysis of variance (ANOVA). If the sample size is large, they use a z-test. Other hypothesis tests include the chi-square test and f-test.

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