Taguchi Method Of Quality Control

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DEFINITION of 'Taguchi Method Of Quality Control'

An approach to engineering that emphasizes the roles of research and development, product design and product development in reducing the occurrence of defects and failures in products. The Taguchi method considers design to be more important than the manufacturing process in quality control and tries to eliminate variances in production before they can occur.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Taguchi Method Of Quality Control'

Genichi Taguchi, a Japanese engineer and statistician, began formulating the Taguchi Method while developing a telephone-switching system for Electrical Communication Laboratory, a Japanese company, in the 1950s. As a result of his success, he eventually became well-known in both Japan and the United States, with companies such as Toyota, Ford, Boeing and Xerox adopting his methods.

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