Take A Bath

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DEFINITION of 'Take A Bath'

A slang term referring to the situation of an investor who has experienced a large loss from an investment or speculative position. Investors whose shares have declined significantly are said to have taken a bath.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Take A Bath'

For example, following the technology boom of the late 1990s and early 2000s, many investors, because of their huge losses, were said to have taken a bath.

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