Takedown

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DEFINITION of 'Takedown'

1. The price at which underwriters obtain securities to be offered to the public.

2. The portion of securities that each investment banker will distribute in a secondary or initial pubic offering.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Takedown'

1. The takedown will be a factor in determining the spread or commission underwriters will receive once the public has purchased securities from them. A full takedown will be received by members of a syndicate. Dealers outside of the syndicate receive a portion of the takedown while the remaining balance remains with the syndicate.

2. In a shelf offering, underwriters essentially 'take-down' securities off the shelf.

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