Takeover Bid

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DEFINITION of 'Takeover Bid'

A type of corporate action in which an acquiring company makes an offer to the target company's shareholders to buy the target company's shares in order to gain control of the business. Takeover bids can either be friendly or hostile.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Takeover Bid'

Some examples of takeover bids include:

Two-Tier Bid: The acquiring company is willing to pay a premium above and beyond the share's price in order to convince shareholders to sell their shares.

Any-and-All Bid: The acquiring company offers to buy any of the target firm's outstanding shares at a specific price.

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