Tangible Personal Property


DEFINITION of 'Tangible Personal Property'

An tax term describing personal property that can be physically relocated, such as furniture and office equipment. Tangible personal property is always depreciated over either a five- or seven-year period using straight-line amortization, but is eligible for accelerated depreciation as well.

BREAKING DOWN 'Tangible Personal Property'

Tangible personal property includes a wide variety of equipment, from small office fixtures to light trucks and buses. It also includes any and all miscellaneous assets that do not inherently qualify for any other class life, such as jewelry, toys and sports equipment. Tangible personal property is the opposite of real property, in a sense, as real property is immovable.

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  1. What is the difference between amortization and depreciation?

    Because very few assets last forever, one of the main principles of accrual accounting requires that an asset's cost be proportionally ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Does working capital include inventory?

    A company's working capital includes inventory, and increases in inventory make working capital increase. Working capital ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Does working capital include salaries?

    A company accrues unpaid salaries on its balance sheet as part of accounts payable, which is a current liability account, ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Are dividends considered an asset?

    Whether dividends paid on stock are considered an asset depends on which role you play in the investment: the issuing company ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What is a profit and loss (P&L) statement and why do companies publish them?

    A profit and loss (P&L) statement, or balance sheet, is essentially a snapshot of a company's financial activity for ... Read Full Answer >>
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    Dividends paid in cash affect a company's balance sheet by decreasing the company's cash account on the asset side and decreasing ... Read Full Answer >>

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