Targeted Accrual Redemption Note - TARN

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DEFINITION of 'Targeted Accrual Redemption Note - TARN'

An investment vehicle, calculated based on a variation of the LIBOR formula, which provides a guaranteed sum of coupons. Once the coupons you've recieved reaches the target cap, the note will be redeemed and you will be paid the par value of the note. Targeted Accrual Redemption Notes (TARN) typically have coupon payments that are based on an inverse floating LIBOR calculation. Thus, they may have good performance in the short-term if interest rates decrease, but may also underperform if interest rates rise.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Targeted Accrual Redemption Note - TARN'

One of the more distinguishing features of a TARN is the possibility of an early termination. It is based on a predetermined accumulation of the coupons. Once that sum is reached, the investor receives the final payment of par and the contract ends.

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