Tax Arbitrage

DEFINITION of 'Tax Arbitrage'

The practice of profiting from differences between the way transactions are treated for tax purposes. The complexity of tax codes often allows for many incentives which drive individuals to restructure their transactions in the most advantageous way in order to pay the least amount of tax. Some forms of tax arbitrage are legal while others are illegal.

BREAKING DOWN 'Tax Arbitrage'

Tax arbitrage can, for example, involve recognizing revenues in a low tax region while recognizing expenses in a high tax region. Such a practice would minimize the tax bill by maximizing deductions while minimizing taxes paid on earnings. It is suspected that tax arbitrage is extremely widespread, but by its nature, it is difficult to give precise figures as to what extent tax arbitrage is employed.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Regulatory Arbitrage

    A practice whereby firms capitalize on loopholes in regulatory ...
  2. Arbitrageur

    A type of investor who attempts to profit from price inefficiencies ...
  3. Statistical Arbitrage

    A profit situation arising from pricing inefficiencies between ...
  4. Triangular Arbitrage

    The process of converting one currency to another, converting ...
  5. Index Arbitrage

    An investment strategy that attempts to profit from the differences ...
  6. Arbitrage

    The simultaneous purchase and sale of an asset in order to profit ...
Related Articles
  1. Options & Futures

    Trading The Odds With Arbitrage

    Profiting from arbitrage is not only for market makers - retail traders can find opportunity in risk arbitrage.
  2. Options & Futures

    Using Interest Rate Parity To Trade Forex

    Learn the basics of forward exchange rates and hedging strategies to understand interest rate parity.
  3. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    How To Invest Like A Hedge Fund

    Hedge funds earn big returns for investors. Find out how they do it and whether you can too.
  4. Options & Futures

    Hedge Funds Hunt For Upside, Regardless Of The Market

    Hedge funds seek positive absolute returns, and engage in aggressive strategies to make this happen.
  5. Active Trading Fundamentals

    Trade Takeover Stocks With Merger Arbitrage

    This high-risk strategy attempts to profit from price discrepancies that arise during acquisitions.
  6. Saving and Spending

    What Baby Boomers Need to Know About IRA RMDs

    Mandatory minimum distributions from traditional IRAs and qualified plans cannot be avoided. But there are several ways to minimize their impact.
  7. Economics

    Understanding Cost-Volume Profit Analysis

    Business managers use cost-volume profit analysis to gauge the profitability of their company’s products or services.
  8. Fundamental Analysis

    5 Must-Have Metrics For Value Investors

    Focusing on certain fundamental metrics is the best way for value investors to cash in gains. Here are the most important metrics to know.
  9. Taxes

    Confused About Estimated Tax Deadlines for 2016?

    If you run a business or have investment income, pay attention to this year's estimated tax deadlines. Here are the details, and what's new for 2016.
  10. Retirement

    Retirement Plan Tax Prep Checklist

    Here's a list of items you need to have in order by tax time, including paying attention to those pesky required minimum distributions.
RELATED FAQS
  1. What is arbitrage?

    Arbitrage is basically buying in one market and simultaneously selling in another, profiting from a temporary difference. ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How Long Should I Keep My Tax Records?

    The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) has some hard and fast rules regarding how long taxpayers should keep their tax records. As ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Are personal loans tax deductible?

    Interest paid on personal loans is not tax deductible. If you take out a loan to buy a car for personal use or to cover other ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Is homeowners’ insurance tax deductible?

    While your fire or homeowners' insurance premiums may be included in your property payments, they are nondeductible expenses, ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. Can working capital be depreciated?

    Working capital as current assets cannot be depreciated the way long-term, fixed assets are. In accounting, depreciation ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. Do working capital funds expire?

    While working capital funds do not expire, the working capital figure does change over time. This is because it is calculated ... Read Full Answer >>
Hot Definitions
  1. Liquidation Margin

    Liquidation margin refers to the value of all of the equity positions in a margin account. If an investor or trader holds ...
  2. Black Swan

    An event or occurrence that deviates beyond what is normally expected of a situation and that would be extremely difficult ...
  3. Inverted Yield Curve

    An interest rate environment in which long-term debt instruments have a lower yield than short-term debt instruments of the ...
  4. Socially Responsible Investment - SRI

    An investment that is considered socially responsible because of the nature of the business the company conducts. Common ...
  5. Presidential Election Cycle (Theory)

    A theory developed by Yale Hirsch that states that U.S. stock markets are weakest in the year following the election of a ...
Trading Center