Tax Break

What is a 'Tax Break'

A tax break is a savings on a taxpayer's liability. A tax break provides a savings through tax deductions, tax credits, tax exemptions and other incentives. An example of a tax break is the First-Time Homebuyer Tax Credit which provided a tax credit up to $8,000 for qualified purchasers of primary residences on their 2009 and 2010 tax returns.

BREAKING DOWN 'Tax Break'

Tax breaks can greatly reduce a taxpayer's liability. Deductions are expenses that can be subtracted from gross income to reduce taxable income; credits reduce tax liability dollar-for-dollar and have a greater impact than deductions; exemptions occur where a tax for a certain item or type of income is reduced or eliminated.

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