Tax Loss Carryforward

What is a 'Tax Loss Carryforward'

A tax loss carryforward is a tax policy that allows an investor to use realized capital losses to offset the taxation of capital gains in future years. When an asset is sold for a gain, the tax code refers to the transaction as a capital gain. The assessed value of an asset is the sale price received by the seller. The difference between the sale price and the asset's cost is subject to taxation.

BREAKING DOWN 'Tax Loss Carryforward'

In addition to selling investments, the sale of a home results in a capital gain, and the property tax base of a house is its assessed value, which may or may not be the sale price recognized. The property tax base of a city is the collective value of all taxable real estate in the city.

Factoring in Capital Gains and Losses

A capital gain or loss is unrealized if you own an asset and have not sold it, while a realized capital gain or loss requires a buy and a sell transaction. A realized capital gain generates a tax liability, and a capital loss can be used to offset your tax liability for gains. When you sell a stock at a loss, for example, the tax code provides a tax loss carryforward process to offset other capital gains and reduce your tax liability, including capital gains realized in the future years.

Assume, for example, that you sell 1,000 shares of XYZ stock for a capital loss totaling $10,000 and that you owned the stock for three years. Capital gains and losses are reported on schedule D of the IRS Form 1040 tax return. If a stock is held more than a year, the holding period is long-term, and the taxpayer offsets long-term gains with long-term losses. Assume that the taxpayer has $3,000 in long-term gains, which reduces the long-term capital loss to $7,000. For this example, assume that the loss is then reduced by $2,000 in short-term capital gains and that $1,000 of the loss is used to reduce other income on the return. The remaining capital loss is $4,000.

How Losses Are Carried Forward

The tax loss carryforward rules allow the taxpayer to offset the $4,000 loss with future capital gains until the entire remaining loss is used for tax purposes. If the taxpayer has $2,000 in capital gains next year, those gains can be offset by $2,000 of the losses that are carried forward. This tax policy allows investors who realize large losses during market downturns to reduce gains recognized over many future years.

RELATED TERMS
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