Taxpayer Relief Act Of 1997

DEFINITION of 'Taxpayer Relief Act Of 1997'

One of the largest tax-reduction acts in U.S. history, this legislation reduced tax rates and offered new tax credits for taxpayers across the board. This act introduced the Child Tax Credit, raised the unified credit limit and the tax exclusion from the sale of a personal residence. This act also provided tax relief for education savings and retirement accounts.

BREAKING DOWN 'Taxpayer Relief Act Of 1997'

The Taxpayer Relief Act of 1997 was signed off on by President Clinton on August 5, 1997. In addition to the aforementioned tax breaks, this act also created a $1.3 million exclusion for farms and small businesses. This act was widely applauded by the American public, and has since provided billions of dollars in tax relief for both personal and business taxpayers.

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