Taxpayer Bill Of Rights (TABOR)

DEFINITION of 'Taxpayer Bill Of Rights (TABOR)'

A measure created by conservative and libertarian groups that seeks to limit the growth of government and to police the actions of the Internal Revenue Service (IRS). The Taxpayer Bill of Rights (TABOR) was born out of years of taxpayer complaints about harassment and abuse of power by the IRS. TABOR also mandates that increases in tax revenue must be reasonably tied to increases in such factors as inflation and population.

BREAKING DOWN 'Taxpayer Bill Of Rights (TABOR)'

The Taxpayer Bill of Rights is part of the Internal Revenue Code. TABOR ensures that the IRS does not abuse its power, particularly in the audit process. It places the burden of proof upon the IRS to make a case against a taxpayer when that taxpayer is able to furnish credible evidence, as requested.

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