Tear Sheets

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DEFINITION of 'Tear Sheets'

A slang term used to describe Standard & Poor's one-page summary sheets for public companies. The summary page gives an overview of business segments, recent operating results and key fundamental analysis metrics.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Tear Sheets'

Tear sheets go back to the old days when stockbrokers would rip individual pages out of the S&P summary book and send them to current or potential clients. These days, most information is extracted online, so any concise representation of a company's business fundamentals could be considered a tear sheet. Brokers often send "tear sheets" to prospective investors to provide insight into possible investments.

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