Technocracy

DEFINITION of 'Technocracy'

A form of government where decision-makers are chosen for a governing office based on their technical expertise and background. A technocracy differs from a traditional democracy in that individuals elected to a leadership role are chosen through a process that emphasizes their relevant skills and proven performance, as opposed to whether or not they fit the majority interests of a population. Decisions made by technocrats are based on information derived from methodology rather than opinion.

BREAKING DOWN 'Technocracy'

A politician who is labeled as a technocrat may not possess the political savvy or charisma that is typically expected of people who sway public opinion in favor of electing him or her to a government position. Instead, a technocrat may demonstrate more pragmatic and data-oriented problem-solving skills in the political arena. Technocracy became a popular movement in the United States during the Great Depression when it was believed that technical professionals, like engineers and scientists, would have a better understanding than politicians regarding the economy's inherent complexity.

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