Telecommunications Consumer Protection Act of 1991 - TCPA


DEFINITION of 'Telecommunications Consumer Protection Act of 1991 - TCPA'

A U.S. federal law created in response to increased consumer concern and complaints directed at the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) regarding the use of telephones for solicitation of business.

BREAKING DOWN 'Telecommunications Consumer Protection Act of 1991 - TCPA'

As a follow up to the TCPA, the Federal Trade Commission and the FCC collaborated to establish a nationwide "do-not-call' registry list to further reduce the number of unwanted phone calls received by households.

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  5. Boiler Room

    A place where high-pressure salespeople use banks of telephones ...
  6. Churning

    Excessive trading by a broker in a client's account largely to ...
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