Telecommunications Consumer Protection Act of 1991 - TCPA

DEFINITION of 'Telecommunications Consumer Protection Act of 1991 - TCPA'

A U.S. federal law created in response to increased consumer concern and complaints directed at the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) regarding the use of telephones for solicitation of business.

BREAKING DOWN 'Telecommunications Consumer Protection Act of 1991 - TCPA'

As a follow up to the TCPA, the Federal Trade Commission and the FCC collaborated to establish a nationwide "do-not-call' registry list to further reduce the number of unwanted phone calls received by households.

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