Temporary New Account

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DEFINITION of 'Temporary New Account'

An account that is set up within a fund to hold a balance as a result of a significant cash inflow or outflow to a fund. The account is set up to hold these funds temporarily until they can be distributed to unit holders, used to acquire additional assets for the fund or for other large fund expenditures.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Temporary New Account'

Temporary new accounts are set up by funds in order to help streamline and simplify the accounting and cash flow process. By setting up separate accounts, a fund can easily determine the amount of money that is going to be distributed to unit holders, or roughly the amount of money it will use to purchase additional holdings for the fund.

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