Tenancy At Will

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DEFINITION of 'Tenancy At Will'

A tenancy agreement where a tenant occupies property with the consent of the owner, but without an agreement that specifies a definite rental period or the regular payment of rent. Tenancy at will is also known as estate at will.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Tenancy At Will'

A tenancy at will is a property tenure that can be terminated at any time by either the tenant or the owner (landlord). It exists without a contract or lease, and is unspecific in duration or the exchange of payment. A tenancy at will arrangement is desirable to tenants and owners wishing to have the flexibility to change rental situations easily and without breaking a contract.

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