Tender Offer

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DEFINITION of 'Tender Offer'

An offer to purchase some or all of shareholders' shares in a corporation. The price offered is usually at a premium to the market price.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Tender Offer'

Tender offers may be friendly or unfriendly. Securities and Exchange Commission laws require any corporation or individual acquiring 5% of a company to disclose information to the SEC, the target company and the exchange.

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