Term Auction Facility - TAF

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Term Auction Facility - TAF'

A monetary policy program used by the Federal Reserve to help increase liquidity in the U.S. credit markets. TAF allows the Federal Reserve to auction set amounts of collateral-backed short-term loans to depository institutions that are judged to be in sound financial condition by their local reserve banks. Participants bid through the reserve banks, with a minimum bid set at an overnight indexed swap rate relating to the maturity of the loans. These auctions allow financial institutions to borrow funds at a rate that is below the discount rate.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Term Auction Facility - TAF'

The TAF was first used by the Fed on December 17, 2007, in response to the 2007 subprime crisis, which caused liquidity problems in the market. After the Fed's attempt to spur liquidity by decreasing its discount rate failed to achieve the desired result, the Fed teamed up with other central banks around the world to create this monetary policy instrument in an attempt to prevent the situation from growing worse.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Discount Rate

    The interest rate charged to commercial banks and other depository ...
  2. Federal Reserve Bank

    The central bank of the United States and the most powerful financial ...
  3. Federal Funds Rate

    The interest rate at which a depository institution lends funds ...
  4. Discount Window

    Credit facilities in which financial institutions go to borrow ...
  5. Liquidity

    1. The degree to which an asset or security can be bought or ...
  6. Credit Crunch

    An economic condition in which investment capital is difficult ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. What is a liquidity squeeze?

    A liquidity squeeze occurs when a financial event sparks concerns among financial institutions (such as banks) regarding ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Economics

    The Federal Reserve

    Few organizations can move the market like the Federal Reserve. As an investor, it's important to understand exactly what the Fed does and how it influences the economy.
  2. Economics

    When The Federal Reserve Intervenes (And Why)

    The Federal Reserve doesn't interfere with the economy every time it flounders. Find out more here.
  3. Investing Basics

    Interest Rates And Your Bond Investments

    By understanding the factors that influence interest rates, you can learn to anticipate their movement and profit from it.
  4. Economics

    What's The Impact On Equities If The Rates Hike?

    The Fed is on course for raising interest rates. True, that leaves the question of when (most likely June or September, but could be later) and how much.
  5. Bonds & Fixed Income

    Why Didn't Quantitative Easing Lead To Hyperinflation?

    Hyperinflation is an exponential rise in prices and tends to occur not when countries print too much money, but is instead associated with a collapse in the real underlying economy.
  6. Investing

    What Has Been Groupon’s Growth Strategy?

    Groupon established a strategy with efforts to become a broader force in the e-commerce world and to expand more strongly into international markets.
  7. Investing

    Are You Ready To Invest In The Tech Sector?

    Tech stocks, particularly those of mature tech companies, are well positioned and offer meaningful upside potential in the near-term.
  8. Investing

    Strategies To Position Your Bond Portfolio

    Fixed income investors may not be able to see them all right now, but important trends are stirring on the investment horizon.
  9. Investing

    The Impact Of A Stronger Dollar In The Markets

    The economy continues to improve, but also demonstrated that some areas of the stock market are more vulnerable to an increase in interest rates.
  10. Economics

    The Impact Of Ending The US Embargo On Cuba

    Many argue that ending the US embargo on Cuba will not only make US consumers happy, but also help the US economy and bring more freedoms to Cuba.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Subsidy

    A benefit given by the government to groups or individuals usually in the form of a cash payment or tax reduction. The subsidy ...
  2. Sunk Cost

    A cost that has already been incurred and thus cannot be recovered. A sunk cost differs from other, future costs that a business ...
  3. Technical Skills

    1. The knowledge and abilities needed to accomplish mathematical, engineering, scientific or computer-related duties, as ...
  4. Prepaid Expense

    A type of asset that arises on a balance sheet as a result of business making payments for goods and services to be received ...
  5. Gordon Growth Model

    A model for determining the intrinsic value of a stock, based on a future series of dividends that grow at a constant rate. ...
  6. Cost Accounting

    A type of accounting process that aims to capture a company's costs of production by assessing the input costs of each step ...
Trading Center