Term Bond

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DEFINITION of 'Term Bond'

Bonds from the same issue that share the same maturity dates. Term bonds that have a call feature can be redeemed at an earlier date than the other issued bonds. A call feature, or call provision, is an agreement that bond issuers make with buyers. This agreement is called an "indenture", which is the schedule and the price of redemptions, plus the maturity dates.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Term Bond'

Some corporate and municipal bonds are examples of term bonds that have 10-year call features. This means the issuer of the bond can redeem it at a predetermined price, at specific times before the bond matures.



A term bond is the opposite of a serial bond, which has various maturity schedules at regular intervals until the issue is retired.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Call Provision

    A provision on a bond or other fixed-income instrument that allows ...
  2. Convertible Bond

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  3. Serial Bond

    A bond issue in which a portion of the outstanding bonds matures ...
  4. Corporate Bond

    A debt security issued by a corporation and sold to investors. ...
  5. Call Premium

    1. The dollar amount over the par value of a callable fixed-income ...
  6. Callable Bond

    A bond that can be redeemed by the issuer prior to its maturity. ...
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