Terminal Value - TV

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DEFINITION of 'Terminal Value - TV'

The value of a bond at maturity, or of an asset at a specified, future valuation date, taking into account factors such as interest rates and the current value of the asset, and assuming a stable growth rate. In addition to bond and asset applications, terminal value can also refer to the value of an entire company at a specified future valuation date. Two common approaches are used to evaluate the terminal value of an asset: the "perpetuity growth model" and the "exit approach."


Also called continuing value or horizon value.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Terminal Value - TV'

The terminal value of an asset is its anticipated value on a certain date in the future. It is used in multi-stage discounted cash flow analysis and the study of cash flow projections for a several-year period. The perpetuity growth model is used to identify ongoing free cash flows. The exit or terminal multiple approach assumes the asset will be sold at the end of a specified time period, helping investors evaluate risk/reward scenarios for the asset. A commonly used value is enterprise value/EBITDA (earnings before interest, tax, depreciation and amortization) or EV/EBITDA. An asset's terminal value is a projection that is useful in budget planning, and also in evaluating the potential gain of an investment over a specified time period.

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