Termination Clause

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DEFINITION of 'Termination Clause '

A section of a swap contract that describes what will happen if the contract is ended early or defaulted on. The termination clause can make the counterparty who is responsible for the default or termination event pay damages to the other counterparty. The agreement value method, formula method or indemnification method can be used to calculate these damages, called "termination payments". When a swap is terminated early, both parties will cease making the agreed-upon payments.



INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Termination Clause '

Counterparties using the International Swaps and Derivatives Association's master swap agreement can take advantage of the termination clause that is already written into that agreement. Possible termination events include legal or regulatory changes that prevent one or both parties from fulfilling the contract terms ("illegality"), the placement of a withholding tax on the transaction ("tax event" or "tax event upon merger"), or a reduction in one counterparty's creditworthiness ("credit event"). Failure to pay or a declaration of bankruptcy by either party are examples of default events.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. How can an investor terminate a derivative contract?

    Most derivatives contracts have provisions allowing for early termination and netting out the initial investment. The early ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What are the main risks associated with trading derivatives?

    The primary risks associated with trading derivatives are market, counterparty, liquidity and interconnection risks. Derivatives ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Should you calculate Value at Risk (VaR) for counterparty credit risk?

    Value at risk (VaR) calculations may be helpful for risk management when trading credit default swaps and other derivatives ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. For what financial instruments is a modified duration relevant?

    The modified duration is a formula used to calculate the percent change in the price of a financial instrument when there ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What is the difference between derivatives and swaps?

    Derivatives are securities with prices dependent on one or multiple underlying assets. Common derivatives include forward ... Read Full Answer >>
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    Tenor – the amount of time left on a debt security's maturity – is important in a credit default swap because it coordinates ... Read Full Answer >>

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