Term Out

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DEFINITION of 'Term Out'

The transfer of debt within a company's balance sheet without acquiring new debt. This is done through the capitalization of short-term to long-term debt.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Term Out'

By changing the characteristic of debt on the balance sheet, companies can improve their working capital situation as well as take advantage of lower interest rates, based upon the projection that they will rise in the future.

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