Terms Of Employment

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DEFINITION of 'Terms Of Employment'

The conditions that an employer and employee agree upon for a job. Terms of employment include an employee's job responsibilities, work days, hours, breaks, dress code, vacation and sick days and pay. They also include benefits such as health insurance, life insurance and retirement plans. Employees whose skills are in higher demand will have an advantage when negotiating terms of employment.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Terms Of Employment'

Most employment contracts in the United States are at-will, meaning that either the employer or employee can legally terminate employment at any time for any reason, though employees cannot be fired for a few legally protected reasons such religion and gender. At-will employment means that an employee can be fired even if he or she does not violate any terms of employment. However, some employees work under contracts that provide job security for the length of the contract as long as they do not violate their contract conditions.

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