Third-Party Technique

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DEFINITION of 'Third-Party Technique'

A marketing strategy in which a company employs outside individuals and firms to promote a specific message about the company itself, its products or its services to media outlets. The third-party technique is most commonly associated with public relations firms, which use the technique to spread marketing messages on their clients' behalf. .

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Third-Party Technique'

Individuals and groups that pass along messages from a public relations firm using the third-party technique rely on the public's perception of them being reliable and independent sources. The public has to believe that the parties presenting the message are genuine and working in their best interest, even if the individual or organization is part of a front group.

Examples of third-party technique include providing advanced news to journalists who will provide a positive review, or hiring researchers to present material that backs up a company's claims

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