Through Bill Of Lading

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DEFINITION of 'Through Bill Of Lading'

A bill of lading that allows the transportation of goods both within domestic borders and through international shipment. The through bill of lading is often required for the exportation of goods, as it serves as a receipt or carriage contract for the products. As with any bill of lading, this document outlines the type and quantity of transported good and notifies the shipper of its destination.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Through Bill Of Lading'

A transporter can move products both within a country and export them, often by air, with a through bill of lading. The through bill contains an "inland bill of lading", which is the documentation required for domestic transportation. If the shipper wants to move the goods across the ocean, the through bill of lading will not be adequate. An "ocean bill of lading" will be required for any goods moving across the sea.

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