Tier 3 Capital

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DEFINITION of 'Tier 3 Capital'

Tertiary capital held by banks to meet part of their market risks, that includes a greater variety of debt than tier 1 and tier 2 capitals. Tier 3 capital debts may include a greater number of subordinated issues, undisclosed reserves and general loss reserves compared to tier 2 capital.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Tier 3 Capital'

Tier 3 capital is used to support market risk, commodities risk and foreign currency risk. To qualify as tier 3 capital, assets must be limited to 250% of a banks tier 1 capital, be unsecured, subordinated and have a minimum maturity of two years.

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