Tiger Economy

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DEFINITION of 'Tiger Economy'

A nickname given to the economies of Southeast Asia. Some of the tigers are Indonesia, Singapore, Malaysia, Thailand, South Korea and China.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Tiger Economy'

With the injection of large amounts of foreign investment capital, these economies grew substantially between the late 1980s and early- to mid-1990s. They then experienced a financial crisis in 1997 and 1998. Some of the reasons for this period of financial turmoil included huge debt-servicing expenses and an inequitable distribution of wealth, as most of the wealth remained in the control of an elite few. Since the late 1990s, these economies have recovered fairly well and are likely to become more active participants in the global market.

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