Tim Geithner

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DEFINITION of 'Tim Geithner'

The 75th United States Secretary of the Treasury. Geithner was appointed by President Barack Obama and confirmed by a 60-34 Senate vote. He took office on January 26, 2009. The Secretary of the Treasury is the principal economic advisor to the president and is responsible for reccomending direction for domestic and international fiscal policy.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Tim Geithner'

A graduate of Johns Hopkins University and Dartmouth College, Geithner is perhaps best known for his efforts in getting a series of government bailouts and stimulus spending programs passed. Even before his role with the federal government, Geithner arranged the rescue and sale of Bear Stearns in 2008 and, later that same year, supported his predecessor, Henry Paulson, in the decision to save American International Group from bankruptcy.

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