Time Draft

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DEFINITION

A type of foreign check that is guaranteed by the issuing bank, but that is not payable in full until a specified amount of time after it is received and accepted. Time drafts are a type of short-term credit used for financing transactions of goods in international trade. They allow the buyer a delay in payment after accepting a shipment of exported goods.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS

Once the buyer accepts the time draft, it becomes a trade acceptance. The exporter can hold the acceptance until maturity and be paid in full, or sell it before maturity at a discount to obtain earlier access to the funds. The time between acceptance and maturity is called "tenor" or "usance." As such, time drafts may be referred to as "usance drafts."


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