Time Deposit

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DEFINITION of 'Time Deposit'

A savings account or certificate of deposit (CD) held for a fixed-term, with the understanding that the depositor can make a withdrawal only by giving notice. A time deposit is an interest-bearing bank deposit that has a specified date of maturity. A bank is authorized to require depositors to give 30 days notice before withdrawing funds from a savings account; however, passbook accounts are typically considered readily available funds and account holders can make withdrawals without giving advance notice. Certificates of deposit are issued for a specified term, such as 30 days (the minimum) up to five years. Although funds can be withdrawn from CDs without notice (on demand), there are penalties for early withdrawal.

BREAKING DOWN 'Time Deposit'

Banks and other financial institutions can negotiate any maturity term (the length of the deposit) that a customer requests, as long as the term is a minimum of 30 days and interest is paid. Once maturity is reached, the funds can be withdrawn without penalty, or it can be renewed and held for an additional term. In most cases, the longer the term, the higher the interest rate will be. For example, a one-year certificate of deposit may offer a 1.10% APY, while a five-year CD for the same amount might provide a 1.75% APY. In addition, larger CDs (those with a higher deposit) generally offer more favorable interest rates.

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