Tjalling C. Koopmans

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DEFINITION of 'Tjalling C. Koopmans'

A Dutch-American economist who won the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics in 1975, along with Leonid Kantorovich, for his research on the optimum allocation of resources and his development of activity analysis. He also developed a chemistry concept called Koopmans' theorem.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Tjalling C. Koopmans'

Koopmans was born in the Netherlands in 1910. As an undergraduate at the University of Utrecht, he studied under fellow Nobel laureate Jan Tinbergen. He earned his Ph.D. in economics from the University of Leiden, and during his Ph.D. studies he spent four months with Nobel laureate Ragnar Frish. Koopmans taught at Yale from 1955 to 1979; prior to that, he taught at the University of Chicago, Princeton University and Erasmus University. The Tjalling C. Koopmans Econometric Theory Prize for the best original research published in the Journal of Econometric Research every three years is named in his honor. Koopmans died in 1985.

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