Today's High

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DEFINITION of 'Today's High'

A security's intraday high trading price. Today's high is the highest price at which a stock traded during the course of the day. Today's high is typically higher than the closing or opening price. More often than not this is higher than the closing price.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Today's High'

When you look at a stock quote, you can find today's high by looking at the second number listed next to "Range." One way that day traders and technical analysts use today's high, along with today's low, is to help them identify gaps or sudden jumps up or down in a stock's price with no trading in between those two prices. For example, if today's low is $25 and the previous day's high is $20, there is gap. The identification of a gap, along with other market signals such as changes in trading volume and overall bullish or bearish sentiment, helps market analysts generate buy and sell signals for particular stocks.

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