Toggle Note

DEFINITION of 'Toggle Note'

A payment-in-kind bond, where the issuer has the option to defer an interest payment by agreeing to pay an increased coupon in the future. With toggle notes, all deferred payments must be settled by the bond's maturity.

BREAKING DOWN 'Toggle Note'

Toggle notes provide firms with a way to raise debt while staying afloat during times of strained cash flow. When cash is at a minimum, the firm can use the toggle to defer an interest payment.

While this seems like an attractive option for the firm, it does come at a cost. The increased interest rate provides ample incentive to not miss an interest payment.

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