Tokyo Commodity Exchange - TOCOM

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Tokyo Commodity Exchange - TOCOM'

The largest marketplace in Japan, and one of the largest marketplaces in the world, for the buying and selling of raw or primary goods, such as natural resources. The Tokyo Commodity Exchange was formed in November 1984 when the Tokyo Textile Exchange, Tokyo Rubber Exchange and Tokyo Gold Exchange merged. TOCOM is a for-profit stock company.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Tokyo Commodity Exchange - TOCOM'

Through the Tokyo Commodity Exchange, which uses an electronic trading system, investors can trade contracts for rubber, gold, silver, crude oil, gasoline, gas oil, kerosene, platinum and palladium. Gold sees the highest trading volume of all the commodities traded on the exchange, followed by platinum, gasoline, crude oil and rubber.



RELATED TERMS
  1. Nasdaq

    A global electronic marketplace for buying and selling securities, ...
  2. Commodity Futures Trading Commission ...

    An independent U.S. federal agency established by the Commodity ...
  3. Clearing House

    An agency or separate corporation of a futures exchange responsible ...
  4. Futures

    A financial contract obligating the buyer to purchase an asset ...
  5. New York Stock Exchange - NYSE

    A stock exchange based in New York City, which is considered ...
  6. Tokyo Stock Exchange - TSE

    The largest stock exchange in Japan, headquartered in its capital ...
Related Articles
  1. How To Invest In Commodities
    Investing Basics

    How To Invest In Commodities

  2. Commodities: The Portfolio Hedge
    Active Trading

    Commodities: The Portfolio Hedge

  3. Commodity Prices And Currency Movements
    Forex Education

    Commodity Prices And Currency Movements

  4. Trading The Soft Commodity Markets
    Options & Futures

    Trading The Soft Commodity Markets

Hot Definitions
  1. Wage-Price Spiral

    A macroeconomic theory to explain the cause-and-effect relationship between rising wages and rising prices, or inflation. ...
  2. Accelerated Depreciation

    Any method of depreciation used for accounting or income tax purposes that allows greater deductions in the earlier years ...
  3. Call Risk

    The risk, faced by a holder of a callable bond, that a bond issuer will take advantage of the callable bond feature and redeem ...
  4. Parity Price

    When the price of an asset is directly linked to another price. Examples of parity price are: 1. Convertibles - the price ...
  5. Earnings Multiplier

    An adjustment made to a company's P/E ratio that takes into account current interest rates. The earnings multiplier is used ...
  6. Macroeconomics

    The field of economics that studies the behavior of the aggregate economy. Macroeconomics examines economy-wide phenomena ...
Trading Center