A Ton Of Money

AAA

DEFINITION of 'A Ton Of Money'

A slang term used to describe a significant amount of money. The amount implied typically depends on the person, company or situation.

BREAKING DOWN 'A Ton Of Money'

We may all have a different idea of what constitutes a "ton of money", but according to the Bureau of Engraving and Printing, a ton of $1 bills amounts to $908,000 - nearly $1 million!

If you're talking about a ton of coins, then it's a different story - a ton of quarters is worth $40,000, and one ton of pennies (363,000 pennies to be exact) is worth $3,630.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Fiat Money

    Currency that a government has declared to be legal tender, but ...
  2. Facebook Credits

    Virtual currency (currency used only on the internet) that can ...
  3. Currency

    A generally accepted form of money, including coins and paper ...
  4. Money

    An officially-issued legal tender generally consisting of currency ...
  5. Fool's Gold

    Also known as iron pyrite, fool's gold is a gold-colored mineral ...
  6. Gold Bug

    An individual who is bullish on gold. Gold bugs believe that ...
Related Articles
  1. Options & Futures

    Handcuffs And Smoking Guns: The Criminal Elements Of Wall Street

    From godfathers to perps, familiarize yourself with the "criminal elements" creeping around Wall Street.
  2. Economics

    What Is Money?

    It's a part of everyone's life, and we all want it, but do you know how it gains value and how it is created?
  3. Investing Basics

    What's a Price-Taker?

    Price-taker is an economic term describing a market participant who has no effect on overall market activity.
  4. Term

    What is Financial Technology?

    Financial technology, or fintech, is a financial services sector that emerged in the 21st century.
  5. Term

    How Does Gamification Increase Productivity?

    Gamification is the process of using game mechanics to engage customers or employees.
  6. Professionals

    Are Stock Buybacks Always Good for Shareholders?

    Stock buyback programs aren't always done with the interests of shareholders in mind. It's important to try to understand the motivation behind such moves.
  7. Professionals

    Why Women Choose Women for Financial Advice

    Women often prefer female financial advisors because client and advisor can relate to each other on a variety of levels.
  8. Economics

    Who Are the Baby Boomers?

    Baby boomer is a descriptive term for a person who was born between the years 1946 and 1964.
  9. Investing Basics

    Understanding Related-Party Transactions

    In business, a related-party transaction refers to a transaction where parties on both sides have a common interest or relationship.
  10. Economics

    Understanding Implicit Costs

    An implicit cost is any cost associated with not taking a certain action.
RELATED FAQS
  1. What is the benefit of the Modified Internal Rate Of Return (MIRR)?

    The modified internal rate of return (MIRR) is a financing metric used in business capital budgeting. Its primary benefit ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Why is the Modified Internal Rate Of Return (MIRR) preferable to the regular internal ...

    Even though the internal rate of return metric is popular among business managers, it tends to overstate the profitability ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Who sets the guidelines for accounting principles?

    While the generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) are not a strict requirement of all U.S. corporations, the guidelines ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Which US cities have the highest number of high-income households?

    According to the most recent U.S. Census report on the geographic concentration of high-income households conducted in 2 ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What happens when a company defaults on its commercial paper obligations?

    As a practical matter, the Issuing and Paying Agent, or IPA, is responsible for reporting the commercial paper issuer's default ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How can I calculate compounding interest on a loan in Excel?

    Compound interest is the amount of interest on a principal amount, along with the accumulated interest on the principal from ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Recession

    A significant decline in activity across the economy, lasting longer than a few months. It is visible in industrial production, ...
  2. Bubble Theory

    A school of thought that believes that the prices of assets can temporarily rise far above their true values and that these ...
  3. Stock Market Crash

    A rapid and often unanticipated drop in stock prices. A stock market crash can be the result of major catastrophic events, ...
  4. Financial Crisis

    A situation in which the value of financial institutions or assets drops rapidly. A financial crisis is often associated ...
  5. Election Period

    The period of time during which an investor who owns an extendable or retractable bond must indicate to the issuer whether ...
  6. Shanghai Stock Exchange

    The largest stock exchange in mainland China, the Shanghai Stock Exchange is a nonprofit organization run by the China Securities ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!