Topix Core 30 Index

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DEFINITION of 'Topix Core 30 Index'

The Topix Core 30 Index is a market index composed of 30 of the largest companies out of the stocks listed on the First Section of Japan's Tokyo Stock Exchange. The Topix Core 30 is one of several different Topix indexes. The Core 30 Index is meant to measure the performance of the 30 companies which are both highly liquid and have the largest market capitalizations. The index is weighted by companies free floats.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Topix Core 30 Index'

The name Topix is an acronym for Tokyo Stock Price Index. It is one of two widely followed index families on the Tokyo Stock Exchange, the other being the Nikkei. In terms of the method of calculation and the use of the index, the Topix indexes can be thought of as being similar to the S&P indexes used in the United States. The Nikkei index is most similar to the U.S. Dow Jones Industrial Average index.

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