Toronto Dollar

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DEFINITION of 'Toronto Dollar'

A local currency used in Toronto, Canada, primarily in the St. Lawrence Market and Gerard Square areas. Only local businesses accept Toronto dollars, which are part of an initiative to encourage consumers to shop locally. Consumers can obtain Toronto dollars at designated local outlets and spend them with any local merchant that accepts them. Toronto dollars are paper bills that come in denominations of 1, 5, 10 and 20 dollars.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Toronto Dollar'

In circulation, one Toronto dollar is worth one Canadian dollar. When consumers exchange Canadian dollars for Toronto dollars, ten cents of every Canadian dollar goes to support local community organizations and the other 90 cents goes into a reserve to support redemptions of Toronto dollars. Consumers receive one Toronto dollar for every Canadian dollar they exchange, but businesses only receive 90 cents for every Toronto dollar they redeem.

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