Torpedo Stock

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DEFINITION

A stock that has fallen substantially in value and that looks like it will continue to fall in value in the foreseeable future. This name refers to this type of stock's similarity to a battleship after it has been struck by a torpedo: it goes down fast and continues to sink until hits the bottom.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS

A change in a business's underlying fundamentals can turn a company's stock into a torpedo stock. For example, investors see earnings as a good indicator of a business' success, as even a gradual rate of earnings growth indicates that a business is doing well. However, quarter after quarter of declining earnings with no end in sight can be enough to cause investors to "jump ship" as a stock's price starts to plummet.


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Hot Definitions
  1. Amplitude

    The difference in price from the midpoint of a trough to the midpoint of a peak of a security. Amplitude is positive when calculating a bullish retracement (when calculating from trough to peak) and negative when calculating a bearish retracement (when calculating from peak to trough).
  2. Ascending Triangle

    A bullish chart pattern used in technical analysis that is easily recognizable by the distinct shape created by two trendlines. In an ascending triangle, one trendline is drawn horizontally at a level that has historically prevented the price from heading higher, while the second trendline connects a series of increasing troughs.
  3. National Best Bid and Offer - NBBO

    A term applying to the SEC requirement that brokers must guarantee customers the best available ask price when they buy securities and the best available bid price when they sell securities.
  4. Maintenance Margin

    The minimum amount of equity that must be maintained in a margin account. In the context of the NYSE and FINRA, after an investor has bought securities on margin, the minimum required level of margin is 25% of the total market value of the securities in the margin account.
  5. Leased Bank Guarantee

    A bank guarantee that is leased to a third party for a specific fee. The issuing bank will conduct due diligence on the creditworthiness of the customer looking to secure a bank guarantee, then lease a guarantee to that customer for a set amount of money and over a set period of time, typically less than two years.
  6. Degree Of Financial Leverage - DFL

    A ratio that measures the sensitivity of a company’s earnings per share (EPS) to fluctuations in its operating income, as a result of changes in its capital structure. Degree of Financial Leverage (DFL) measures the percentage change in EPS for a unit change in earnings before interest and taxes (EBIT).
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