Total Project Approach

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DEFINITION of 'Total Project Approach'

A way to compare net income or contribution margin results by looking at the revenue and cost of a project. The total project approach looks at two alternative choices and compares the net income or contribution margin of the two choices.


Also referred to as comparative statement approach.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Total Project Approach'

For example, a company is planning to expand production and wants to buy a new machine for this purpose. The new machine will cost $50,000 and has a life-span of five years. The machine it is replacing also has a remaining life of five years with a book value of $12,500. Being that it is a new and more efficient machine, the new purchase will reduce variable operating costs from $25,000 to $15,000 annually.

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