Total Return

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DEFINITION of 'Total Return'

When measuring performance, the actual rate of return of an investment or a pool of investments over a given evaluation period. Total return includes interest, capital gains, dividends and distributions realized over a given period of time.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS'Total Return'

Total return accounts for two categories of return: income and capital appreciation. Income includes interest paid by fixed-income investments, distributions or dividends. Capital appreciation represents the change in the market price of an asset.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. What is the difference between yield and rate of return?

    Both rate of return and yield describe the performance of investments over a set period of time (normally a year), but they ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Which is more important - dividend yield or total return?

    Both dividend yield and total return are terms used to describe the performance of a stock over a certain time period, usually ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How do gains from my 401(k) figure into my taxable income?

    Capital gains from a 401(k) account figure into taxable income in that capital gains are taxed at the ordinary income rate ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What are the tax implications for both the company and investors in a divestiture ...

    In finance, divestiture is defined as a reduction of a company's assets as a result of asset closures or the selling of business ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What is the importance of calculating tax equivalent bond yield?

    Fixed-income investors measure portfolio returns using yields. Since most bonds do not produce high returns like equity markets, ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What are the drawbacks of a small investor buying blue-chip stocks?

    Blue-chip stocks are generally safer for investors. However, their drawbacks for small investors include moderate growth ... Read Full Answer >>

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