Trade-Weighted Dollar


DEFINITION of 'Trade-Weighted Dollar'

A measurement of the foreign exchange value of the U.S. dollar compared against certain foreign currencies. Trade-weighted dollars give importance - or weight - to currencies most widely used in international trade, over comparing the value of the U.S. dollar to all foreign currencies. Since the currencies are weighted differently, changes in each currency will have a unique effect on the trade-weighted dollar and corresponding indexes.

BREAKING DOWN 'Trade-Weighted Dollar'

The trade-weighted dollar is used to determine the U.S. dollar purchasing value, and to summarize the effects of dollar appreciation and depreciation against foreign currencies. When the value of the dollar increases, imports to the U.S. become less expensive while exports to other countries become more expensive.

Two primary measures of the trade-weighted dollar are used. The first is the U.S. Dollar Index, created in 1973. It is calculated using six major world currencies: the euro, Japanese yen, Canadian dollar, British pound, Swedish krona and Swiss franc. The second is the Trade Weighted U.S. Dollar Index, sometimes called the Broad Index. This index was introduced by the U.S. Federal Reserve Board in 1998 in response to the implementation of the euro (which replaced many of the foreign currencies that were previously used in the earlier index) and to more accurately reflect current U.S. trade patterns. The Federal Reserve selected 26 currencies to use in the broad index, anticipating the adoption of the euro by eleven countries of the European Union (EU). When the broad index was introduced, U.S. trade with the 26 represented economies accounted for over 90% of the total U.S. imports and exports.

  1. Currency

    Currency is a generally accepted form of money, including coins ...
  2. Exchange Rate

    The price of a nation’s currency in terms of another currency. ...
  3. Foreign Currency Effects

    The gain or loss on foreign investments due to changes in the ...
  4. U.S. Dollar Index - USDX

    A measure of the value of the U.S. dollar relative to majority ...
  5. Forex - FX

    The market in which currencies are traded. The forex market is ...
  6. Equilibrium

    The state in which market supply and demand balance each other ...
Related Articles
  1. Forex Education

    Currency Exchange: Floating Rate Vs. Fixed Rate

    Baffled by exchange rates? Wonder why some currencies fluctuate while others are pegged? This article has the answers.
  2. Options & Futures

    Traders: Which Markets Should You Trade?

    Being aware of other markets and other trading methods can help traders fine tune methods, save costs and add profits.
  3. Economics

    Investing Opportunities as Central Banks Diverge

    After the Paris attacks investors are focusing on central bank policy and its potential for divergence: tightened by the Fed while the ECB pursues easing.
  4. Economics

    Long-Term Investing Impact of the Paris Attacks

    We share some insights on how the recent terrorist attacks in Paris could impact the economy and markets going forward.
  5. Economics

    Understanding Donald Trump's Stance on China

    Find out why China bothers Donald Trump so much, and why the 2016 Republican presidential candidate argues for a return to protectionist trade policies.
  6. Markets

    Will Paris Attacks Undo the European Union Dream?

    Last Friday's attacks in Paris are transforming the migrant crisis into an EU security threat, which could undermine the European Union dream.
  7. Economics

    Who Stands To Lose (And Gain) From The Paris Attacks

    For every major world event, there are those who stand to lose and those who stand to gain. A look at the short, medium, and long-term impacts of the Paris attacks.
  8. Investing News

    How the Paris Attacks Could Impact the Economy

    The horrific terror attacks in Paris will have a ripple effect on comsumer spending and tourism.
  9. Retirement

    What Was The Glass-Steagall Act?

    Established in 1933 and repealed in 1999, the Glass-Steagall Act had good intentions but mixed results.
  10. Investing

    World Bank Data For Dummies

    Developing countries can't always afford to track the data crucial to setting the right economic policies and programs. That's where the World Bank steps in.
  1. What is the correlation between American stock prices and the value of the U.S. dollar?

    The correlation between any two variables (or sets of variables) summarizes a relationship, whether or not there is any real-world ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What am I buying and selling in the forex market?

    The forex market is the largest market in the world. According to the Triennial Central Bank Survey conducted by the Bank ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How do you make working capital adjustments in transfer pricing?

    Transfer pricing refers to prices that a multinational company or group charges a second party operating in a different tax ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Marginal propensity to Consume (MPC) Vs. Save (MPS)

    Historically, because people in the United States have shown a higher propensity to consume, this is likely the more important ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. Do lower interest rates increase investment spending?

    Lower Interest rates encourage additional investment spending, which gives the economy a boost in times of slow economic ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. When do I need a letter of credit?

    A letter of credit, sometimes referred to as a documentary credit, acts as a promissory note from a financial institution, ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Barefoot Pilgrim

    A slang term for an unsophisticated investor who loses all of his or her wealth by trading equities in the stock market. ...
  2. Quick Ratio

    The quick ratio is an indicator of a company’s short-term liquidity. The quick ratio measures a company’s ability to meet ...
  3. Black Tuesday

    October 29, 1929, when the DJIA fell 12% - one of the largest one-day drops in stock market history. More than 16 million ...
  4. Black Monday

    October 19, 1987, when the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) lost almost 22% in a single day. That event marked the beginning ...
  5. Monetary Policy

    Monetary policy is the actions of a central bank, currency board or other regulatory committee that determine the size and ...
  6. Indemnity

    Indemnity is compensation for damages or loss. Indemnity in the legal sense may also refer to an exemption from liability ...
Trading Center