Trade Date Accounting

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DEFINITION of 'Trade Date Accounting'

A method company accountants and bookkeepers use to record transactions that take place on the date at which an agreement has been entered (the trade date), and not on the date the transaction has been finalized (the settlement date). If the transaction involves interest, the interest cannot be recorded on the books until the settlement date has arrived.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Trade Date Accounting'

The distinction between trade date and settlement date accounting is an important one, as it can impact the company's financial statements. For example, assume ZXC Corp., which has a year end of December 31, purchases a new factory with debt on December 26, and takes possession of this factor on January 31 of the next year.

If ZXC uses trade date accounting, the asset and loan amount will be recorded in the company's books - without any interest accruing for the five days - on December 26. If they used settlement data accounting, the asset and liability will be recorded in the company's books on January 31 of the following year.

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