Trade Resumption

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Trade Resumption'

To resume trading activities after having been shut down (halted) for some period of time. This can relate to trading between nations, or the resumption of open-market trading in a security such as a common stock or even an entire exchange.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Trade Resumption'

Trading will be halted in a security if there is material information that needs time to disseminate, or fundamental questions have been raised about the reliability of previously-released information.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Program Trading

    Computerized trading used primarily by institutional investors ...
  2. Securities And Exchange Commission ...

    A government commission created by Congress to regulate the securities ...
  3. Exchange

    A marketplace in which securities, commodities, derivatives and ...
  4. Trading Curb

    A temporary restriction on program trading in a particular security ...
  5. Trading Halt

    A temporary suspension in the trading of a particular security ...
  6. Held

    A reference to a long position in a security. The term "held," ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. What does the underlying of a derivative refer to?

    A derivative security is a financial instrument in which the price of the derivative is dependent on its underlying asset. ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What does it mean to take delivery of a derivative contract?

    When trading derivative contracts for options, a buyer or holder may have to take delivery of the underlying asset if the ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What does the notional principal of a derivative contract refer to?

    The notional principal amount of a derivative refers to the nominal, or predetermined, value used to calculate payments made ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How can derivatives be used for speculation?

    Derivative securities could be bought or sold to speculate on the future price of the underlying assets. Derivative securities' ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What does it mean when I get a Fed margin call?

    Understanding fed margin calls and how they affect your trading account is part of investing basics. A margin account allows ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What does it mean to roll a derivative contract?

    A derivative is a financial instrument in which the price of the derivative is dependent on an underlying asset. A derivative ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Markets

    Material Adverse Effect A Warning Sign For Stocks

    Learn what this phrase means and how to spot it in a company's financial statements.
  2. Options & Futures

    Getting To Know The Stock Exchanges

    Here are the answers to all the questions you have about stock exchanges but are too afraid to ask!
  3. Economics

    Defining Illegal Insider Trading

    The better you understand why insider trading can be criminal, the better you'll understand how the market works.
  4. Investing

    A Case Study: Earnings Manipulation And The Role Of The Media

    Here we explore why the media focuses on certain earnings manipulation cases in post-Enron Wall Street.
  5. Investing Basics

    Understanding Open-End Funds

    An open-end fund is a type of mutual fund that does not limit the amount of shares it issues, but issues as many shares as investors are willing to buy.
  6. Investing Basics

    What is a Nominal Value?

    The nominal value of a security, such as a stock or bond, remains fixed for the duration of its life.
  7. Fundamental Analysis

    Calculating Future Value

    Future value is the value of an asset or cash at a specified date in the future that is equivalent in value to a specified sum today.
  8. Investing

    The Strong Dollar’s (Real) Toll On Tech Stocks

    A large portion of U.S. technology companies’ sales occur overseas, given the strong international business and consumer demand from many U.S. tech firms.
  9. Investing

    The Case For Stocks Today

    Last week, U.S. equities advanced with the S&P 500 Index notching new records. Investors are now getting nervous with rate and currency volatility spiking.
  10. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    Why You May Want To Be (And Stay) In Bonds

    Bonds are complicated, and it’s easy to feel intimidated or confused. Fortunately, you don’t need to be a numbers geek to be an informed investor.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Stop-Loss Order

    An order placed with a broker to sell a security when it reaches a certain price. A stop-loss order is designed to limit ...
  2. Covered Call

    An options strategy whereby an investor holds a long position in an asset and writes (sells) call options on that same asset ...
  3. Butterfly Spread

    A neutral option strategy combining bull and bear spreads. Butterfly spreads use four option contracts with the same expiration ...
  4. Unlevered Beta

    A type of metric that compares the risk of an unlevered company to the risk of the market. The unlevered beta is the beta ...
  5. Moving Average - MA

    A widely used indicator in technical analysis that helps smooth out price action by filtering out the “noise” from random ...
  6. Yield Curve

    A line that plots the interest rates, at a set point in time, of bonds having equal credit quality, but differing maturity ...
Trading Center