Trade Working Capital

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DEFINITION of 'Trade Working Capital'

The difference between current assets and current liabilities directly associated with everyday business operations.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Trade Working Capital'

This measure is relevant in analyzing the near-term financial health of a company, as only current assets and current liabilities used for everyday business are considered.

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