Trading Arcade

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Trading Arcade'

A slang term for an electronic trading facility where local investors can get together and trade for their own accounts. The arcade is often run by a member of a clearing organization, and has no physical trading area or pit.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Trading Arcade'

The users of an arcade are referred to as "e-locals", because their trading activities are all electronically executed. Trading arcades are often large rooms with computer terminals and television sets everywhere, allowing traders to react quickly to news and enjoy the convenience of electronic trades.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Electronic Communication Network ...

    An electronic system that attempts to eliminate the role of a ...
  2. Prediction Market

    A collection of people speculating on a variety of events - exchange ...
  3. Exchange

    A marketplace in which securities, commodities, derivatives and ...
  4. Clearing House

    An agency or separate corporation of a futures exchange responsible ...
  5. Japan Association Of Securities ...

    An electronic security exchange based in Tokyo, Japan. Originally ...
  6. New York Stock Exchange - NYSE

    A stock exchange based in New York City, which is considered ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. What are the requirements for being a Public Limited Company?

    The requirements for an entity to be considered a public limited company (PLC) include registration requirements, establishing ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Is there a difference between financial spread betting and arbitrage?

    Financial spread betting is a type of speculation that involves a highly leveraged derivative product, whereas arbitrage ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How do I place an order to buy or sell shares?

    It is easy to get started buying and selling stocks, especially with the advancements in online trading since the turn of ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What is the difference between the return on total assets and an interest rate?

    Return on total assets (ROTA) represents one of the profitability metrics. It is calculated by taking a company's earnings ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. When does the holding period on a stock dividend start?

    The holding period on a stock dividend typically begins the day after it is purchased. Understanding the holding period is ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What does a high turnover ratio signify for an investment fund?

    If an investment fund has a high turnover ratio, it indicates it replaces most or all of its holdings over a one-year period. ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Forex Education

    Market Makers Vs. Electronic Communications Networks

    Learn the pros and cons of trading forex through these two types of brokers.
  2. Options & Futures

    Direct Access Trading Systems

    DATs can dramatically speed up order execution - find out how this system gives novice traders an edge.
  3. Options & Futures

    10 Tips For Choosing An Online Broker

    This important investment decision happens before you pick your first stock. Find out how to get it right.
  4. Trading Systems & Software

    The Global Electronic Stock Market

    The way trading is conducted is changing rapidly as exchanges turn toward automation.
  5. Options & Futures

    Brokers and Online Trading

    How do you find the right broker for your investment needs? Start by reading our broker tutorial.
  6. Retirement

    Electronic Trading Tutorial

    Learn about the systems that run the market. Topics include market makers, specialists, SuperDOT, ECNs, SOES, Level I, II, and III Access, and more.
  7. Fundamental Analysis

    Explaining Price Targets

    A price target is what an investment analyst projects a security’s future price to be.
  8. Investing Basics

    Understanding Buy Stop Orders

    A buy stop order is an order to buy a stock at a specific price above its current market price.
  9. Investing Basics

    Explaining Bond Ratings

    A bond rating is a grade given to a bond to indicate its creditworthiness.
  10. Investing Basics

    Explaining Absolute Return

    Absolute return refers to an asset’s total return over a set period of time. It’s usually applied to stocks, mutual funds or hedge funds.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Bogey

    A buzzword that refers to a benchmark used to evaluate a fund's performance. The benchmark is an index that reflects the ...
  2. Xetra

    An all-electronic trading system based in Frankfurt, Germany. Launched in 1997 and operated by the Deutsche Börse, the Xetra ...
  3. Nuncupative Will

    A verbal will that must have two witnesses and can only deal with the distribution of personal property. A nuncupative will ...
  4. OsMA

    An abbreviation for Oscillator - Moving Average. OsMA is used in technical analysis to represent the variance between an ...
  5. Investopedia

    One of the best-known sources of financial information on the internet. Investopedia is a resource for investors, consumers ...
  6. Unfair Claims Practice

    The improper avoidance of a claim by an insurer or an attempt to reduce the size of the claim. By engaging in unfair claims ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!