Trading Margin Excess

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DEFINITION of 'Trading Margin Excess'

The funds that remain in a margin trading account that are available to use towards the purchase of a new position or the increase of an existing position. Traders and investors often take advantage of margin accounts that provide a leveraged amount of funds with which to trade or invest.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Trading Margin Excess'

A margin account allows traders or investors the ability to purchase beyond the actual cash value of the account by utilizing leverage. For instance, a trader could have $10,000 cash in a trading account and be able to trade a value of $100,000 with a 10:1 leverage. The trading margin excess is the funding that is currently available to trade with. While margin allows traders and investors the opportunity to profit, caution must be used due to the potential to sustain catastrophic losses.

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