Trading Margin Excess

DEFINITION of 'Trading Margin Excess'

The funds that remain in a margin trading account that are available to use towards the purchase of a new position or the increase of an existing position. Traders and investors often take advantage of margin accounts that provide a leveraged amount of funds with which to trade or invest.

BREAKING DOWN 'Trading Margin Excess'

A margin account allows traders or investors the ability to purchase beyond the actual cash value of the account by utilizing leverage. For instance, a trader could have $10,000 cash in a trading account and be able to trade a value of $100,000 with a 10:1 leverage. The trading margin excess is the funding that is currently available to trade with. While margin allows traders and investors the opportunity to profit, caution must be used due to the potential to sustain catastrophic losses.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. Why do you need a margin account to short sell stocks?

    The reason that margin accounts and only margin accounts can be used to short sell stocks has to do with Regulation T, a ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What is a margin account?

    A margin account is an account offered by brokerages that allows investors to borrow money to buy securities. An investor ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How is margin interest calculated?

    Before running a calculation you must first find out what rate your broker-dealer is charging to borrow money. The broker ... Read Full Answer >>
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    Fibonacci retracement is a very popular tool among technical traders and is based on the key numbers identified by mathematician ... Read Full Answer >>
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    Traditionally, mutual funds have not been considered leveraged financial products. However, a number of new products have ... Read Full Answer >>
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