Trading Strategy

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DEFINITION of 'Trading Strategy'

A set of objective rules designating the conditions that must be met for trade entries and exits to occur. A trading strategy includes specifications for trade entries, including trade filters and triggers, as well as rules for trade exits, money management, timeframes, order types, etc. A trading strategy, if based on quantifiable specifications, can be analyzed on historical data to project the future performance of the strategy.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Trading Strategy'

A trading strategy outlines the specifications for making trades, and includes rules for trade entries, exits and money management. When properly researched and executed, a trading strategy can provide a mathematical expectation for the specified rules, and help traders and investors determine if a trading idea is potentially profitable.

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